Making Sense of Japan’s New Law on Assisted Reproduction Technology

Last Monday, 25th of January 2021, Azumi Tsuge (University of Tokyo) offered insight into Assisted Reproductive Technology in Japan in another exciting, interdisciplinary seminar organized by Sci-Tech Asia and CIAS. 

The webinar, Making Sense of Japan’s New Law on Assisted Reproduction Technology, is available online, in HERE

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On December 4, 2020, the Diet, Japan’s Parliament, finally issued a law that recognizes married (heteronormative) couples who had children through donated eggs and/or sperm as legal parents. This is the first law concerning assisted reproductive technology (ART) in Japan. The new law gives legal recognition to married couples who have children using donated eggs and sperm, but it leaves many other issues on the table waiting further deliberation. The need to implement legislation regarding ART was first brought to the attention of Japanese society in 2003—almost 20 years ago—when the first draft of the current law was prepared by a special committee formed for that purpose. This committee recommended that non-commercial sperm donation and egg donation should be allowed under certain conditions and that both commercial and non-commercial surrogacy should be banned. The new law follows some of these recommendations, but it does not recognize the children’s right to have access to the identity of the egg or sperm donors. Why it took almost 20 years for Japan to issue its first law regulating the practice of ART? This talk pro-vides an answer to this question by looking at changes in Japanese society and societal attitudes towards ART in the past 20 years.

To know more about this presentation as well as the Webinar series organized by Sci-Tech Asia, visit their website – https://scitechasia.org/ – or their Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/scitechasia.

Making Sense of Japan’s New Law on Assisted Reproduction Technology

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